Ever Hear of the Rule of Odds?

In photography a pretty common term is “rule of thirds”. But another compositional photography term is “rule of odds: Here is the definition of the “rule of odds”. I try to use it as much as possible but it is hard with moving birds. It takes time, patience and luck. Also important is the “rule of odds” also can be applied to groups of odd numbers as in a 3 different groups of birds or whatever. Be careful with the odds, I find 3 objects works well, anything else gets...

Falling in Love with your Photo

The more I looked the more I saw Try to be objective about your photos. At first glance I liked the above photo but the more I looked the more flaws I saw. I saw the blurred foot especially. The blur drew my eye to the wrong spot. The twig in front of the Black-crowned Night-Heron was a distraction too. Trying to rationalize will only make it worst. It was a good try under difficult conditions to even get this particular shot. But it is not a wall hanger. Delete it and move on. Time will erase your feelings for this...

Photo Within the Photo

This photo was chosen to represent the month of January 2020 for the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve Calendar The original interesting photo looked like this: Sometimes just changing the photo slightly can make a difference. I do it often particularly with bird head...

IMPACT IS THE NAME OF THE GAME

… AND STAY OUT The number one element in obtaining a merit photo (80 or above in most cases) is impact. There are exceptions, BUT, don’t lose sight of impact. Usually a good impactful photo tells a story. Judges / people should not have to wonder what the photographer is trying to say through the...

I Can’t Find Anything to Shoot

Sometimes I get “brain freeze” and just can’t seem to have an idea what I want to photograph. Here is an example of what I found on my patio. A honeybee busy at work. Opportunities are all around if you are patient. Sometimes I just sit and wait for a gift to come...

A nice little tool_Wimberley Plamp II

Often when shooting macro or really close-up, I could use something to hold a leaf, branch, flashlight, light diffuser or just something to gently push something else to the side. I like to use what is called a Plamp II.  The official name is a Wimberley Plamp II.  Here are a few photos of the Plamp II in action and CLICK HERE for a You Tube video link that will give you more information and ideas:   In this series of photos, I used the Plamp II by attaching it to a chair and the stem of milky weed.   It helps too when the wind is blowing and you attach the Plamp to the stem of a flower to give  it more sturdiness. Also, as I said before, you can use the Plamp just to move other vegetation to the side and out of the way of the shot without damaging any plants or living things. The video gave me the idea of using a small flash light which can come in handy...